Top Ten Personal Development Books

Top Ten Personal Development Books

Top Ten Personal Development Books

I love a good personal development book, not because I’m white-trash living by self-help books, simply because I find them quite informative and relaxing to read. They’re my guilty pleasure, you could say.

Today I thought I would share my Top Ten favourites, most of these I listened to as audiobooks but would recommend in all formats.

Girl, Wash Your Face by Rachel Hollis

I read this book before discovering it is technically a ‘Christian’ book. I avoid religious-led books like the plague, as I’m not the least bit of religious and find it quite off-putting to hear/read ‘from the blessings of God’ in these books. But there wasn’t too much of that in Rachel Hollis’ books. Rachel was fairly down-to-earth and honest, and I enjoyed her take on addiction to Diet Coke and the process of adopting her daughter, and having hope even when knocked down.

Why Social Media is Ruining Your Life by Katherine Omerond

One of my all-time favourites. As someone is fascinated by social media at the best of times – obsessed by not with FYI – this was a great read. I bought it the second it was released and devoured it. There are great statistics, brilliant anecdotes and really good insight from Katherine.

How to Fail by Elizabeth Day

I’ve listened to the How to Fail podcast a few times, but I decided to listen to Elizabeth’s book on a a whim and it was harrowing. The chapter on her miscarriage was so moving and heartbreaking that that’s all that I can truly remember about it. It’s a powerful book about the beauty of not reaching your dreams or changing your mind.

Help Me by Marianne Power

I loved this hilarious book. Marianne decided to follow a self-help book’s instructions for one month each. What comes out of it is a great read on the ridiculousness of some self-help books and the genuine helpfulness of others. While the book’s main aim is not to be a self-help book it does have that unintentional benefit as I desperately wanted to go swimming at Hampstead Heath after reading it.

Eat Up by Ruby Tandoh

Ruby was a runner-up on the Great British Bake Off, and famously came out on Twitter after being criticised for ‘flirting’ with Paul Hollywood on the show. Her book is a light read on why we should eat whatever the hell we want, because that’s what our bodies are craving and therefore it’s good for us. If you want a pizza, have it, if you want a vegetable, have it! Forget diets, which are bad for your mental health, and enjoy food for what it is.

The Discomfort Zone by Farrah Storr

Written by the editor of Elle magazine, this book focuses on the topic of discomfort and failure. To achieve anything you must enter your discomfort zone, because if there’s a part of you that isn’t scared, worried or unsure about a decision then it’s not worth making. Life is not meant to be easy, and the way to succeed is to push through discomfort and improve. A brilliant personal development read for people thinking about their careers or about to make a big decision in life.

Alone Time by Stephanie Rosenbloom

I love a good travel book, as you’re about to see with the next three books in this list! I particularly love to travel alone. Travelling with friends and family is great, but you’re always tethered to doing what other people want to do and limited time. When you travel alone you have 100% of the choice and 100% of the time, so you can do as little or as much as you want without guilt. And that’s what Stephanie Rosenbloom did when she travelled the globe. Very inspirational as at travel book and for personal development.

Departures by Anna Hart

The second I finished this book, and I mean the second, I booked a trip to New York City on my own. Anna Hart is an Irish journalist who from the age of 18 has travelled the world. She just loves to travel and goes wherever she wants, on her own or with friends and family who want to join. Even when those holiday’s go badly she finds a way to make a positive out of it and reminds you that that’s just life, and there’s no reason not to go on living. A brilliant read.

What I Was Doing While You Were Breeding by Kirstin Newman

I bought that while on said-holiday in New York and it was hilarious. Kirstin is a comedy writer based out in LA who writes for 6 months a year and travels the rest of it. Not one to settle down, she has had worldwide romances, adventures and misadventures across the globe and lived a full life because of it.

The Friendship Cure by Kate Leaver

And finally, a brilliant look at a much neglected relationship we all have: friendship. This is a wonderful, easy, even some-what addictive read on friendship and the different friendships we’ll undoubtedly have throughout our lives. I love Kate’s writing and the topics of which she writes about and I can’t wait to see what she does next.

What are your Top Personal Develop Books? Let me know in the comments below.

Love Ellie x

Top Ten Personal Development Books

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